Doctor alleges pharmacy denied woman medication for miscarriage

An Omaha doctor says a pharmacy refused medicine to a patient during her miscarriage. The doctor said the pharmacist was wrong. The doctor said women should never be denied the drug and wants other patients to know. “I would say two to three times a week I offer this medicine to a patient,” said Dr Meghan Oakes. Oakes is well versed in miscarriages, often prescribing misoprostol to help women shed remaining tissue. “The medical term for miscarriage is spontaneous abortion,” Oakes said. “The term abortion itself simply means the termination of a pregnancy. What we think of today, when we think of abortion, is elective abortion. But there are others , missed abortion, threatened abortion, incomplete abortion, unavoidable abortion, septic abortion.” This week, she learned that a patient had miscarried in her first trimester and was denied medication at her pharmacy. The prescribing doctor said she noted to the pharmacy that the medicine was for medical miscarriage. “The pharmacist refused to dispense this medicine, later returning and telling the supplier that there was a Nebraska law that required the supplier to be present for this drug. be distributed,” Oakes said. Oakes said there is no law in Nebraska that requires a doctor to be present for misoprostol. There is a different drug that does this, which is sometimes prescribed with misoprostol. the drug that terminates a pregnancy is a different drug. This drug must be dispensed by a doctor,” she said. Doctors believe the pharmacist saw the words “spontaneous abortion” and questioned its use, denying the drug. He said she had called the pharmacist and again the pharmacist denied the drug despite his explanation. Oakes thinks it’s a side effect of the reversal of Roe v. Wade and changing laws across the country. “It’s leading to fear and that leads to suspicion and that leads to confusion. And her and the person in pain is this poor woman who had a miscarriage,” Oakes said. Walmart, the pharmacy where the woman was denied medication, said she could not comment on a specific patient’s situation, but said, “We may request additional information to clarify a prescription when it is it’s not clear what it’s for. We don’t need a doctor to be present to dispense medication in the event of a miscarriage” Oakes said all providers should be aware of abortion laws and drug restrictions, especially in an emotional situation like a miscarriage.” It didn’t have to happen. this confusion,” Oakes said. “Nothing has changed in Nebraska. Abortion is legal in Nebraska. Medical abortion is essential. they can help find a pharmacy to fill the prescription.

An Omaha doctor says a pharmacy denied a patient medication during her miscarriage.

The doctor said the pharmacist was wrong.

Nebraska doctors said it’s a common drug for women who have miscarried, but not all fetal tissue has left their bodies yet.

The doctor said women should never be denied the drug and wants other patients to know.

“I would say two to three times a week I offer this medication to a patient,” said Dr Meghan Oakes.

Oakes is well versed in miscarriages, often prescribing misoprostol to help women evacuate remaining tissue.

“The medical term for miscarriage is spontaneous abortion,” Oakes said. “The term abortion itself simply means the termination of a pregnancy. What we think of today, when we think of abortion, is elective abortion. But there are others, missed abortion, threatened abortion, incomplete abortion, inevitable abortion, septic abortion.

This week she learned that a patient had miscarried during her first trimester and was refused the drug at her pharmacy. The prescribing doctor said he noted at the pharmacy that the drug was for medical miscarriage.

“The pharmacist refused to dispense this medication, later coming back and telling the provider that there was a Nebraska law that required the provider to be present for this medication to be dispensed,” Oakes said.

Oakes said there is no law in Nebraska that requires a doctor to be present for misoprostol.

There is a different drug that does this, which is sometimes prescribed along with misoprostol.

“In this scenario, misoprostol is not the drug that terminates a pregnancy, it is a different drug. This medicine must be dispensed by a doctor,” she said.

Doctors believe the pharmacist saw the words “spontaneous abortion” and questioned its use, denying the drug. The doctor who prescribed it said she called the pharmacist and again the pharmacist refused the medicine despite her explanation.

Oakes thinks it’s a side effect of Roe v. Wade and changing laws across the country.

“That leads to fear and that leads to suspicion and that leads to confusion. And that and the person that’s hurting is that poor woman who had a miscarriage,” Oakes said.

Walmart, the pharmacy where the woman was refused medication, said she could not comment on a specific patient’s situation, but said: ‘We may request additional information to clarify a prescription when it is It’s not clear what it’s for. We don’t need a doctor to be present to give medication in the event of a miscarriage.”

Oakes said all providers should be aware of abortion laws and drug restrictions, especially in an emotional situation like a miscarriage.

“It wasn’t supposed to happen. There wasn’t supposed to be this confusion,” Oakes said.

“Nothing has changed in Nebraska. Abortion is legal in Nebraska. Medical abortion is essential.

Oakes wants people to know that a pharmacist can refuse a drug because of their beliefs, but a patient can contact your doctor and he can help you find a pharmacy that will fill the prescription.

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